Ideas

In London, a museum unveils a cheese created from celebrity armpit bacteria

We bet you're not ready for the weird little question of the day: would you eat cheese made from armpit bacteria celebrities ? Yes, you read that ... It's very serious.

Cheeses made from human bacteria, harvested from underarms, toes, belly buttons and nostrils celebrities. Rather crazy, no? Among the first volunteers for this experience, celebrity chef Heston Blumenthal and Blur bassist Alex James. The cheeses that result from their bacteria will therefore be presented at the new exhibition of the Victoria & Albert Museum in London.

called "Food: Bigger than the Plate", the exhibition is an ambitious project that intends to explore everything; from urban farms and gastronomy, to policy and sustainable development of the food system. And among all this, will be exposed the "Human cheese" as an experiment, conducted by the synthetic biologist Christina Agapakis and the olfactory artist Sissel Tolaas.

During these last months, five cheeses were allowed to "mature" in a cave specially created for this purpose in a laboratory in London. For their cheeses, the celebrities have chosen to be recreated in specific cheeses: the Blur cheese musician Cheshire, the chef Heston Blumenthal County, the British rapper Professor Green in Mozzarella, and the singer of Madness in Young Cheddar.

Credits : Open Cell

In order to create these "human cheeses", scientists have drawn from body areas which are, in general, real cozy nests for bacteria. Here, Chef Heston Blumenthal's nostrils, Blur's Alex James's armpits and the ears of Suggs, the Madness singer.

But the question we all ask ourselves ... Why ? Frankly, why? In addition to proving that microbes in our skin can produce cheese, the experiment aims to challenge our limits disgust and improve our appreciation of microbial world.

When scientists saw microbes under their microscopes at 19th century, they realized that some were the cause of some diseases. Processes to kill these bacteria then developed, such as pasteurization of food and sterilization of medical instruments, which saved countless lives. But with these bad bacteria, we are destroying a few everyday that may be crucial to our well-being and our immune resistance.

In short, if it turns out that these cheeses are good for the health (because we do not know it yet, at the present time), would you eat it? 🧀

Credits : Open Cell

Credits : V & A Blog

Credits : V & A Blog

Credits : V & A Blog

Credits : V & A Blog

Credits : Mishko Papic

Credits : Mishko Papic

Imagined by: Victoria & Albert Museum of London

Video: British Museum unveils largest-ever manga exhibit outside Japan (August 2019).